Write For You

We can talk as much as we want about writer’s block – dare I say it aloud? – and how it is holding us back. I can try to give you plans for fixing your plot holes or coming up with a better villain. I can tell you that your writing is important and that we need your story or poem in the world.

As nice as those things are, I can’t fix your problems. Guys, I can’t figure out how to fix my problems sometimes. Not the technical ones anyway. Technical problems are the ones you can only learn to fix after you’ve already pushed through the rough patch. At some point, you’ll look back at the work you did; you’ll stare at your blood, sweat and tears in the mirror; you’ll finally realize how you got through it all. The truth is, every writer is different. We each have different writing styles and voices, strengths and weaknesses, ideas and opinions, and lights and darknesses.

The one thought I’ve always held onto when I can’t write one more word is this:

I know who I’m writing for. I know I’m writing because I want to write. Not because somebody is telling me that I have “talent” or “potential” or “a good idea”. No, no, and nope. I’m choosing to sit at that computer and pour my soul onto a page. I’m writing for me, myself, and…okay, my writing bucket list every once in a while. 

I’m not a pep-talker or a cheerleader or even an optimist, for that matter. I don’t know if my writing will take off or get me anywhere. Ultimately, that’s not what matters most. Believe me, I would be so happy if an idea or novel of mine gets turned into a TV show or movie. I would love to have my own book signing and hold a copy of my brain-child (do people still use that word?) in my hand. After all that, I’m not writing for you, and I’m not writing for your second cousin’s sister’s boyfriend’s fish.

The best piece of advice I can give to you is to just keep plugging along. Care a little less about your word count and your page count and your reads/votes on Wattpad. If you don’t finish your story, how is it ever going to get turned into a TV show? I have to remind myself of this every time I sit down to write.

Your writing matters. Remember that.

– Natalie

 

Wait, Motives Actually Matter?

Sometimes writing realistically is the hardest thing in the world. Who am I kidding? Writing realistically IS the hardest thing in the world. Have you ever read a novel/novella/short story where the whole time you were just laughing at how ridiculous the situations came about? Do you ever hate it when everything happens to the characters and not because of the characters? Does your protagonist lack a driving motive?

Motives create everything. You’re writing your story because of (fill in the blank with your motive for this specific story). You chose your protagonist because of ___. Your antagonist hates the protagonist because of ___. Even if having a motive for the protagonist confuses you, there needs to be something driving his or her actions.

An easy way to recognize strong motive is to analyze your antagonist situation. Since antagonists can be anything, opposing motives can take any form against the protagonist. If you’re writing a romance novel, maybe there are just too many secrets between the protagonist and the love interest for there to be a successful relationship. In that case, the antagonist could either be secrets or perhaps the characters’ minds working against them. This scenario is a bit difficult to analyze because secrets don’t really have a motive. Secrets do always create problems; that’s just a natural thing. If your antagonist is just the universe working against your protagonist, that’s okay! You don’t necessarily need a dragon or a lawsuit to cause tension in your story.

When you have an antagonist in human or group form, there are some other motives to think about. People get jealous. People get angry or scared. People get nervous or feel threatened by someone else. If your antagonist (Joe) is working against the protagonist (Hannah) because he’s scared of her psychic abilities, you have a strong motive. Not every antagonist’s motive has to be ‘oh my gosh, I just really, really wanna take over the world’. Voldemort wants a nose – I mean, Voldemort wants to live forever/kill Harry. Kronos wants to rise from Tartarus. Queen Levana wants to marry Kai/kill him. President Snow is just a pain in the neck in every respect.

Now that you’ve identified your antagonist’s motive, take a look at your protagonist. If you’re flipping or scrolling through your story and getting bored/rolling your eyes at everything, you might have one or all of five main problems:

  1. Your plot is dull
  2. Your characters are flat
  3. Your basic story has been written a million times
  4. Your antagonist/protagonist is ridiculous
  5. You’re just tired of thinking about your story

I see these problems every time I open my documents or notebooks. I have these problems today. I’ll have them tomorrow. They are never going to go away. That’s okay, though, because I know the basics of fixing them. Now I can’t help you fix letter E. That one is all up to you to work on. One of my biggest problems is either A or D. This post is talking mainly about letter D.

Many times, your story is flat or dull or ridiculous because your protagonist isn’t moving. Yeah, maybe terrible things are happening to her. Yeah, maybe the antagonist is pushing all her buttons. But what is she doing? Why is she fighting against the antagonist? Is she tired or scared or protecting someone? Is she actually super evil and trying to take over the world while the antagonist tries to stop her? Before you can tweak the dialogue or add in those commas, think long and hard about why your protagonist is doing whatever she’s doing.

Stories are about lives. Sometimes these lives are completely out-of-this-world. Literally. Like Luke Skywalker. In life, everyone is a protagonist in a different story than the next person. Good stories aren’t about the protagonist who decided to accept her fate as a punching bag for the antagonist. She can’t just wait for an anvil to fall onto her enemy. I mean, she could technically do that, but she’d just be wasting time. Good stories are about what the protagonist decides to do about something. It can be saving the world, destroying the world, buying a cat, or getting the number of the guy next door.

Your characters are supposed to drive your story. Don’t just make things happen. Coincidences don’t make up a good plotline. Have your protagonist make a bad decision every once in awhile. What are the consequences? How do they set her back from her goals? How do they benefit the antagonist? Do these consequences just add fuel to the antagonist’s bonfire?

Look over your story. Figure out your motives if you haven’t already. Remember that you’re telling a story and not just torturing your protagonist. I know it’s fun. Keep in mind that what drives your character will develop as you write. Maybe her motive will bring about an interesting backstory or subplot. Your story will benefit so much from just having a motive for each major character.

Thanks for reading this all-over-the-place post! 

Until next time,

Natalie  

 

Understanding Perspective

The easiest mistake to make in writing is to muddle your character’s perspective.

It happens all the time, and it usually isn’t intentional. The problem is, when this happens, your readers are left scratching their heads and wondering what happened to the MC’s worldview.

First off, I want to make something clear.

If your MC (aka main character, by the way) doesn’t have a perspective on life, then he/she is very similar to a piece of cardboard that can walk around and make intelligible noises.

No one wants to read about a boring piece of cardboard, do they?

Well, some people might, but that’s beside the point.

The point, my friends, is that it’s very, very, VERY important that you understand your character’s perspective. And it is also important that you understand how to understand your MC’s perspective.

If you’ve never really thought about it, you may come up with something like this…

For example: Timothy (MC) believes that books are evil. He hates propaganda and free speech. He believes in oppressing opinions and that children should not learn how to read.

Now, reading over this quickly sounds like you have a solid understanding of Timmy’s perspective. (And it’s an awful perspective on life, if you ask me…)

But let’s just say you sat down to write and you began to write about Timmy’s life and his daily conversations with people.

You may run into a few speed bumps pretty quickly.

Just writing down what a character believes isn’t the same as understanding. You may write down that they believe eating oatmeal every day will vastly improve life on earth… And then you will have them walking around, spouting off this information without a clue as to why they are doing it.

Why?

The all-important question.

You probably were expecting that understanding perspective required a complicated process… It’s not complicated. All you have to do is ask yourself why do they believe what they believe? Why do they hold that opinion/point of view?

To be honest, “why” can turn into a whole discussion. You will never reach one conclusion. However, every start to understanding something requires you to climb into the bottomless well of “why”…

Instead of just being there to make your life difficult and to make you feel annoyed at the amount of thinking you have to do, the “why” question will smooth your writing path as you go along. You’re going to have to answer it some time, and getting it done at the beginning will take away a ton of rewriting you would’ve had to do.

For example.: Timothy believes all books are evil because…

Honestly, I can’t give a reason for that because that has no reason. It is irrational thinking.

You get the point.

And you just got a little pep talk about understanding perspective.

To help you along, here are a few steps you can take to better understand your character’s perspective.

  1. Make a list of opinions/beliefs that define your character
  2. Dig into the back story of your character and examine their motives
  3. Ask the “why” question and fill in the because blank
  4. Take your character’s perspective and read it (and his/her’s reasons for believing it) aloud to a friend. Ask if they could understand the reasons. (Understanding is different from agreeing with.)
  5. Write a dialogue between two characters using that perspective. Does it make sense? Does it seem to come from the character himself? Could you see this in the real world as a perspective someone might actually have?

Perspectives change. That’s what makes a character arc so special.

This is another reason why understanding perspective is so important. You can’t make a perspective change if you didn’t really know what it was in the first place.

Yes, you may know that Timmy thinks books are evil, but you can’t make that belief change.

Why not?

Because you won’t be able to provide relevent reasons why his perspective should change in the first place. At least from his point of view.

So yeah.

Understanding perspective is very important. And it helps a ton with planning character arcs.

I hope this helped, and good luck with your character perspectives!

-Julia, H

 

 

Ghoulish Grammar – The Line Edit Stage

You’ve polished up your plot lines, fixed all big-picture edits, and read your whole manuscript so many times you’re sick of it. What now?

Now comes the line edit stage!

What is line editing? As the name implies, you are poring through your manuscript line by line to make sure that there’s no awkward phrasing, spelling errors, or grammatical mistakes in your novel.

This tends to sound incredibly boring and tedious to most people, but for me, I relish it. Why? Because it gives the logical part of my brain something to work on.

Think about it. Writing a novel is an emotion and creativity-based venture. You’re stepping into another character’s head, while trying to make sure their dialogue is natural, the world-building is superb, characters have motives for everything they do…. etc. You get the point.

When you get to the line edit stage, you stop with all the dithering about ‘would my character really do that?’ and ‘does my story work as a whole?’ and focus in on the specific wording of each sentence.

Granted, I enjoy both, but this second part allows me to utilize a whole different skill-set.

However, yes, it can get tiring skimming through every sentence of a 40-70k book (assuming you write YA fiction, and if you write adult books, it’s even longer)!

What do I recommend? I’m glad you asked.

  1. Use apps! I personally have 3 websites I alternate between, all free.
    • The first is Grammarly, which is free and picks through your entire story for grammatical mistakes. It also analyzes story tone and other things like that, but for an added fee, so I just ignore that. One note is that I’ve found Grammarly likes correcting to the British spelling (i.e., colour instead of color), so watch out for that.
    • The second is Story Analyzer. This has the same function as Grammarly, but I’ve used it less, simply because of where I was in editing my novel when I discovered this resource. I believe this has Americanized spelling, so that’s a plus for it, but it doesn’t hurt to use both. (Here’s a link to the story analyzer).
    • The final, and most effective, is Hemingway App. It helps those writers that strive for efficient use of words in their writing. It highlights sentences that are worded weirdly, grammatical mistakes, AND tense changes. It is, by far, the most helpful of all the three on the list, for myself personally. 😉
  2. Break your story up into chunks, and do a little at a time. It’s overwhelming if you try to do everything at once, so don’t worry about that. Instead, pick small sections- and reward yourself for completing them.
  3. Enlist help! A fresh set of eyes can work wonders for a manuscript. While hiring someone is the best bet if you want to publish your book, a friend with a critical eye can also make magic happen.
  4. Work on writing a different story at the same time. This one is more controversial, because you should really be laser-beam focused on one thing at a time. However, if you’re working on a short story or a novella, it’ll give your creative juices a chance to thrive. Alternating between the two gives you a chance to use both sides of your writing brain!
  5. Bribe yourself, if needed. Say if you line-edit one chapter a day, when you complete the first half of your novel, you’ll go to the movies or buy something you really wanted.
  6. Lean on the writing community for support. Most of us have been there, and we’re more than willing to give you encouragement!

Good luck, you guys! Comment down below if you have tips of your own for the line edit stage.

~Rebecca M. 

Guest Post by Natalie – Storytelling

One of the most important parts of storytelling is the story you’re trying to tell. Unfortunately, as writers (myself included) get really into the struggle of plots and characters and worlds, they tend to forget why the story exists in the first place. Granted, many stories spring to life because of a picture or a song or a cool character/plot line. These are valid stories and I have worked with many of them myself. Other times, however, a writer may begin a story because she has a message/story or an emotion that she wants to convey.

Some stories relate to a real life, everyday struggle. Even in fantasy worlds, there are still relatable aspects of the actual “story” or “moral” of the story.

Maybe you’ve based a character off yourself or maybe you created an antagonist that you see eye to eye with. Maybe your story is completely about you. Sometimes the best way to get through your own issues when you have no idea what to do is to sit down and write about it. Make it somebody else’s problem. See how they defeat it. Use their victory as courage.

This post is short, I know, but it has a purpose. It’s a reminder to every writer out there, even if they don’t know this applies to them. It does.

Remember why you’re writing. Remember the story. Think beyond your plot holes and dusty manuscripts (or lack of plot and manuscripts if you’re anything like me). Fight for your characters and fight for the people who could be touched by your message. Even a story you’re writing because of plots and characters means something. If it means something to you, chances are it will mean even more to someone else.

Until next time,

Natalie

 

Gone With the Wind Movie Review

Good morning everyone! I will be beginning the month of June by discussing the movie based on my all time favorite book.

Gone With the Wind is an ingenious story set during the time of the Civil War in America.  The main character is intentionally unlikable while the other major characters all have their lovable quirks.  The writing in this book is phenomenal, having one of my most loved first lines, “Scarlet O’Hara was not beautiful.”

Based on this brief selection of my many praises for the book, it should not come as a surprise to you that I would like to say a few words to the director of the highly-acclaimed movie, Gone With the Wind. 

I am not saying that the movie itself was a bad rendition of the story, but it is missing quite a few key parts. I think the director deserves some praises for making the characters portrayed so well, and not messing up the overall story line, but in my personal opinion the development of Scarlet and Rhett’s relationship was cut short and messed up due to the fact that Scarlet’s two other children were lacking from the movie.

I believe that those two children played important roles in the story since it was originally because of them that Rhett became so close to the family, and eventually led to his departure from it because of Scarlet’s intense desire not to have more children and deliberate act of not caring for the ones she already had.

I apologize for this brief rant, but I believe that even characters as minor as Scarlet’s two children have a major impact on the development of any story.

What would you change about the movie, Gone With the Wind? 

Defying Stereotypes in Writing

Stereotypes. The word itself leaves a bad taste in my mouth.We all know the sorts of things I’m talking about.

A shy, quiet girl falling for the popular boy and the two of them ending up in a relationship. The hero or heroine of a fantasy being the object of a prophecy that makes it so they HAVE to complete their quest for motives that are not entirely their own.

What, guys? Why would you do this to your story? Your plot becomes boring, uninspiring, and- let’s face it- downright predictable.

And what keeps a reader reading? They want to find out what happens! If they already know what’s going to happen, what’s the payoff for the reader?

So now it’s time to subvert the reader’s expectations, rather than giving them another lesson about how ‘introversion is a flaw that needs to be overcome’, ‘girls will find love if they change themselves to accommodate the athletic idiot’, and ‘guys who express their emotions are girly’, or any other cliches.

How can you apply this to your story?

For myself, I write fantasy. The cliche is that it has to be set in medieval Europe (specifically, England), there’s no modern technology whatsoever, heroines are always featured in love triangles, and magic is innately given + has only smaller limits, such as not resurrecting people from the dead.

My latest story will be set near modern times, on an island archipelago where there’s modern technology, a heroine that does not waste her time dithering about who loves her or doesn’t love her, and magic is a talent that can be learned (despite some being predisposed to better use magic)… and on top of that, magic can only be used for an objectively good purpose, such as defending their country from invaders.

Am I saying you all have to be so extreme about how many differences you have? Of course not. Most writing advice is subjective, and what works for me, may not work for you.

But I urge you to take a close look at your genre and its’ expectations and make sure your read is unpredictable.

Best of luck.

~Rebecca M.